Maisonette P155 | Ippolito Fleitz Group – Identity Architects

 


Description by Ippolito Fleitz Group – Identity Architects :

An architect and a textile designer have created a sanctuary in a listed Wilhelminian building in a sought-after location on the edge of Stuttgart’s city centre. Their new apartment stretches over two floors with an unusual tapering floor plan that resembles a slice of cake. The 290 m² have been transformed into a vibrant cabinet of curiosities, filled with mementos and inspirational pieces, which they have collected or sourced on their travels.

A characteristic period feature of the building is its layout of individual rooms grouped around a central hallway. This layout was carefully modified, respecting the building’s listed status, to create a spacious, open discourse with shifting vistas and overlapping perspectives.

The upbeat is given by a pale grey, gallery-like hallway, which forms a cabinet brimming with travel curiosities. A striking element is a wooden bench from India, which draws you into the space, accentuating the suction effect of the trapezoidal layout. A black, herringbone parquet floor runs from here throughout the apartment, giving the suite of rooms a flowing feel and creating a strong graphic counterpart to the typically bourgeois Wilhelminian architecture.

At the head of the hallway is the living room, a salon-like space with strong contrasting colours, intense graphic elements and large forms. A lemon yellow bookcase is positioned against powder blue walls. A deep pile rug with a bold, geometric pattern in strong colours and a Moustache chair are more works of art than pieces of furniture, yet even these are outdone by the expressive pictures and objects on the walls. Two circular, intersecting shapes on the ceiling take over the circles theme, which is echoed at multiple points in the room, as well as spotlighting life below.

The dining room is dominated by textile materials such as a dark green, silk wallpaper and finds from exotic travels, including Uzbek ikat cloth, Indian silk embroideries, Laotian textile applications and African Losa basketwork. A ceiling mural by Alix Waline brings an additional dynamic to the space. In the centre of the room stands a large rosewood table, about which various chairs are gathered. One end of the table top is lacquered black. This shiny reflective surface creates a bridge to the piano as well as to a smoked oak sideboard hanging on one wall. Its partially black lacquered front resembles a fragmented mirror and dissolves the solidity of its form. A hand-crocheted curtain of paper yarn picks up the textiles theme in a more abstract way and provides a fascinating contrast to the elegant, heavy, putty-coloured cotton velour.

The dining room and salon are connected at their far ends by a small room with a bay window. Here the graphic character of one room and the textile materiality of the other merge in a specially commissioned psychedelic wallpaper, which challenges the eye and forms a provocative backdrop to several colourful artworks. A contrast comes from the more subdued, natural materials world of the furniture and the intense light that is filtered into the room through golden venetian blinds, which shine brightly in the sun.

An asymmetric, curved wall opening in the opposite end of the salon leads into the staircase room, the only room in which the original oak parquet floor has been preserved. The walls of this room are papered with an English,  hand-printed wallpaper featuring an opulent, jungle motif. The exotic atmosphere is heightened by a life-size wooden horse, an archaic artefact from India, which stands before a dark grey, smoked glass wall. Creating a first connection to the upper storey, two suspended lamps emerge from a ceiling opening to hang above the horse, almost like a rider. The upper storey is reached via a staircase with indigo treads and a dark green stringer.

From the staircase room, a second double-leaf door leads into the bedroom, which is also a library. A floor to ceiling bookcase covers the longitudinal wall and draws your gaze into the room. A mirrored wall leading to the dressing room underscores this impression of depth. The dark wood of the bookcase and sideboards coupled with the elegant colour of the walls give the room a delicate feel. A silken Berber rug and the leather of the bed bolster the quiet, elegant impression of the space. A concealed door in the mirrored wall leads into a dressing room, which contains two large, white, hanging wardrobes. Two circular, incised areas of glass dispel the volume of the furniture.

To the right of the hallway lies a spacious bathroom. The salmon-coloured design is in harmonious dialogue with the limestone of the floor and several walls. Multiple mirrored surfaces expand the space and create optical bridges to the other rooms by means of reflections. A freestanding washstand made from rosewood with a superimposed mirror unit form a strong centrepiece, about which are grouped a freestanding bathtub and walk-in shower. Black, wooden, venetian blinds and a black, dotted pattern on the ceiling provide some necessary contrast in the otherwise soft atmosphere.

The bathroom connects through to a gym, which doubles as a guest bedroom. Lemon yellow walls fade into a white ceiling and suffuse the room with energy. A floor to ceiling closet provides storage and conceals a fold-out guest bed, while its mirrored front is the perfect backdrop to your daily workout.

Cooking with friends is one of the owners’ passions. So the kitchen at the other end of the apartment has a stainless steel, industrial-style kitchen block at its centre. Original tiles on the floor and wall provide a scintillating contrast to the precise, sharply edged, solid surface, built-in cupboards. A freestanding marble-topped table offers space for more intimate gatherings.

The guest WC is located next to the kitchen. This small room with its many wall-mounted pipes was panelled to create a clean, polygonal shape. The folded effect of the walls is dissolved by a geometric mural. A softly curving mirror provides a welcome contrast and also expands the space.

The upper storey houses a spacious study and private TV lounge. The light-flooded top floor also has access to a generous terrace with a view of the treetops in the neighbouring avenue. A stunning view over Stuttgart is visible in the other direction. The green theme is programmatic here: The room is filled with succulents of all shapes and shades of green. A bed nestled in one of the dormer windows offers space for additional visitors. An interior bathroom with a steam shower and generous visibility into the room and to the outside creates a sensual centrepiece.

The maisonette is a museum of memories and a showroom for the creativity of its owners in one. In place of a closed, consistent aesthetic, the apartment functions as a collage of variegated moods. Yet in spite of their seeming disparity, a synthesis is achieved that perfectly reflects the personality of the owners in the individual rooms.


                           (TEAM: Kim Angenendt, Hanna Drechsel, Gunter Fleitz
Lena Hainzinger, Peter Ippolito, Masafumi Oshiro
Verena Schiffl, Markus Schmidt)

Location: Stuttgart, Germany

Photographs: Eric Laignel, Zooey Braun


 

 

 

 

 

 

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Modern loft | IDwhite

 


Design Office: IDwhite

Location: Kaunas, Lithuania


 

White House | RIGI Design

 


Design Office: RIGI Design

Location: Shanghai, China

Area: 240,0 m2

Photographs: Tian Fangfang


 

 

Two level floor Apartment | Studio Interjero Architektura + Architect Indre Sunklodiene

 


Design Studio: Studio Interjero Architektura + Architect Indre Sunklodiene

Location: Vilnius, Lithuania

Photographs: Leonas Garbacauskas


 

Industrial Loft II | Diego Revollo Arquitetura

This 100,00 m2 loft  is located in in São Paulo, Brazil.

It was designed by Diego Revollo Arquitetura.

Description by Diego Revollo Arquitetura:

This 100 m2 Loft with structure and apparent installations is located in the noble neighborhood of Morumbi, in São Paulo.

Although the aesthetic appeal of New York sheds converted into housing in the 1970s is the main justification for the male audience in explaining their desire for this style of property, Diego Revollo, who is knowledgeable about this repertoire and with some other lofts in his portfolio, knows that this profile prioritizes good materials and functionality.

Handed by the builder almost without walls and already with the mezzanine, the apartment did not need a great remodel, except for the bathroom that was reduced and received black coating (floor, walls and ceiling) in burnt cement carbon. Diego Revollo invested in elegant finishes and original solutions to adapt the spaces.

There was a big integration in the ground floor, but eliminating the L-shaped bench from the kitchen and swapping it out for a dinner table has removed any kind of barrier.

Designed as a large box the social area had ceilings and walls brushed with gray burnt cement, highlighting the black metallic skeleton and the apparent electrical pipe, since in this type of solution it is not good to mask the structure, cover beams or put linings, says the architect.

The decoration of the loft was supportive, explains Diego Revollo. To warm the essentially dark palette and break sobriety, the tauari wood covers the entire floor and mats and objects bring color to it. The main attraction of the room, the TV shelf designed by Diego Revollo, resembles a pile of crates, and allows you to see the texture of the wall in the background.

 The well orchestrated tones of this loft in São Paulo highlight the industrial atmosphere.


Design Office: Diego Revollo Arquitetura

Location: São Paulo, Brazil

Area: 100,00 sq.m.

Photographs:  Alain Brugier


 

SH House | Paulo Martins Arq & Design

The SH House, in Sever do Vouga, Portugal,  with the clear colours and a minimalist language is the perfect place for a weekend break.

It was designed by Paulo Martins Arq & Design.


Description by Paulo Martins Arq & Design:

Established in only 35m2, this house with an useful floor area of 45 m2 is the perfect place for a weekend break.

With the original outline, the only change was in the existing stairwells, through the usage of weathering steel e dimensioning its usage according to the visual weight in order to hierarchize the absence of mass. This way, it was possible to balance the whole building.

The house is divided in two floors, where the social room, placed in the ground floor, enjoys the direct relation with the outdoor areas, while the suite, located in the first floor, can be reached by indoor stairs used for storage and but also to separate the rooms.

The original outline was as important as the contemporary style added to the building. Clear colours and a minimalist language were used in order to maximize the bounds and give an idea of wider and open area.


Design Office: Paulo Martins Arq & Design

Location: Sever do Vouga, Portugal

Photographs: Its. Ivo Tavares Studio


Summer House in Greece | Cometa Architects

Cometa Architects has designed a summerhouse in Kea Island, Greece. This house developed for the Mediterranean climate, using local materials and sustainable energy saving methods.


Description by Cometa Architects:

The steep ground and the plot’s narrow dimensions along with the very strict building regulations determine the pronounced and gradient form of the building which rises from the mountain and over the valley of Poisses, to finally balance itself with the surrounding traditional dwellings and the natural context. The island of Kea is characterised by its rocky dry hillsides creating poetic sculptural formations, amplified under the mediterranean sun. This wild raw nature, is what this building tries to preserve along with the use of the traditional manners of building, which have survived through the centuries, but lately neglected. Drylayring stonework locally quarred, low rise building which blend with the context, small openings which control the heat, and rain water collection are some of the methods that local ´architecture without architects´ dwelling culture has been using.

The principal material chosen is the local stone, carefully crafted against the horizontal microcement surfaces. Eager to apply the fundamentals of sustainable construction, the largest sum of the stone used, was from this same stone quarred from excavating the site itself in order to lay the foundations. Additional stone for finishings was brought from the local Stone quarry. Local stonworkers used the traditional method of dry stonework, breaking and shaping the stones according to the form and needs.

This secondary home of a family of four, spreads through 3 correlated volumes, which clearly can be defined as the seating & kitchen volume, the circulation tower and the sleeping & storaging volume. Around these volumes, the perimetrical terraces are unfolding, some under the surface of the hill, some at the same level and some projected over it. This experience of this Cycladic landscape is the design’s main concern expressed through this spatial evolution and relationship of the building with the dramatic land. This is achieved through the traditional method of construction called “kotounto”, a dry, humid-free space between the rock and the building. In such a way, these external spaces, makes the building sometimes trying to break away from the rock and sometimes to reconcile with it.

Apart from this traditional tecnique of the humid free gap between the rock and the building, which is principlally used to drain the waters coming from the mountains, leaving walls and foundations dry, the house includes in its design an under-floor heating installation which circualtes hot water, generated by the solar heaters installed in the roof. The cooling is achieved from cross ventilation, a typical traditional method of local construction having many small openings diagonally placed from each other and also an additional under-floor cooling is provided. The pérgola is shading the big openings from the morning sun leaving the sunset colors slip in and paint the white interior ´canvas´ deep yellow and red. Finally, the rainwater is collected in the 3 rooftops and stored in an underground reservoir.

Another take on the traditional and sustainable island architecture are the simple minimal furnishings, many of which are built into the whitewashed interior. The sofas doubling for storage space, the wraparound counter space in the kitchen; the beds even the benches and wood-topped table of the veranda outdoor’s aim to provide a modest but comfortable living. Materials, such as the natural rope, floor-to-ceiling, “banister”, the wooden kitchen, the pale grey painted wooden window frames and shutters which are contributing in the control of the heat and the ease of the breeze are elements that honor the local tradition but perfectly serve the modern needs.

– HONORABLE MENTION IN DOMES ARCHITECTURE AWARDS IN CATEGORY BEST NEW BUILT, GREECE, 2017

– SILVER AWARD IN A`DESIGN AWARDS, FOR ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING AND STRUCTURE DESIGN CATEGORY, ITALY 2017


Design Office: Cometa Architects

Partner Architect in stage A: Betty Tsaousi
Team: Faidra Matziaraki & Victor Gonzalez Marti
Betty Tsaousi, Olga Balaoura (stage a)
Laura Mascuñan, Denisse Gómez Casco (stage b)

Location: Kea Island, Greece

Structural Engineer: Nikos Zoulamopoulos

Interior design: Faidra Matziaraki & Victor Gonzalez Marti

Site surface: 10530.00 m²

Built surface: 115.00 m²

Photographs: Dimitris Kleanthis


 

The Wolf House | Wolf Architects


Description by Wolf Architects:

When you arrive at the house you enter via a formal pedestrian entry. Beyond that is a contemporary Chinese garden which in itself is a playful expression of east meeting west. A bridge over a dry riverbed directs you the office at the rear.

The office can accommodate several people and has its own bathroom and kitchenette. This allows for future use as an additional bedroom or granny flat. Resale is always an important consideration and most of the spaces were designed to be flexible in use.

It was agreed that one of the most unsustainable things in houses is doing premature renovations. This house was designed with long term vision in mind.

At the front of the house is a large north facing yard which provides a great space for children to play privately and securely. It leads onto a generous double height front porch which then directs you into the house.

The front porch has a dark polished concrete floor with a sealant that allows for the floor to also be a large blackboard for children to draw on. The main living space opens onto this northern yard with a set of quality commercial grade bi-fold doors which open completely.

The floor level between the inside, front porch and lawn is very slight and this further blends the inside to the outside.

Entry into the house is through a large walnut veneered door. Instead of a sculpture ahead or painting hanging on the wall, the wall is in itself a piece of art. This approach was taken throughout the house with many of the family’s collections. The objects for display are integrated into the architecture.

The Star Wars action figures for example, are on individual stands on a wall and this forms a part of the walls texture making the whole display a feature in the interior architecture.

The heart of the ground floor is triangulated by the living, dining and kitchen spaces. These areas were considered in the brief to be where the family spend most of their time together and therefore had to be interconnected. They are separated primarily by a double sided fireplace, an example of clearly defined spaces without walls. The kitchen is positioned at the western point of the triangle and acts as a control tower from which most of the house and landscaping beyond can be overseen.

Enhancing Everyday Living…

Encouraging Connectivity throughout…

The residence is separated from the office by an operable glass wall located at the southern end of the dining room. Within the office is a space for one of the classic cars. The dining room is at the bottom of the vertical corridor and by looking upwards one understands why the house is so light filled. Light penetrates in most areas from multiple windows. No artificial light is required throughout the day and at night the house’s lighting is almost 100% LED. The dining room is strategically placed in the centre of the home and with a large void above it to enhance the feeling of sacredness, representing how the family regard meal times spent together daily.

The site was not without its challenges. Certain elements of the previous 1940’s residence we retained for cost saving reasons and in consideration of embodied energy and sentimental value. These areas included:

– The existing master bedroom and ensuite which had been renovated several years prior

– A yellow brick tunnel which now has a mural painted by the owner

– The front fence

– The rear yard

– A large 4 car tin shed

The result was a house that consisted of 28 interconnected spaces unfolding over 10 subtle level changes. The key to the design is a multi-purpose vertical corridor which acts as a thermal chimney. It also allows for many internal views and vistas which are integral to the houses connectivity. Light can also penetrate through the space, allowing the Northern sunlight to penetrate to the deepest parts of the house.


Design Office: Wolf Architects

Location: Victoria, Australia

Area: 441.6 m2

Photographs: Dave Keluza


Party Apartment | Nghiêm Phong + Đào Thành

 


Design Office: Nghiêm Phong, Đào Thành

Location: Keangnam, Ha Noi, VietNam

Area: 350.0 m2

Project Year: 2016

Photographs: Quang Tran


 

 

Hazukashi House | ALTS Design Office

ALTS Design Office has created a space, in Kyoto – Japan, with the charm which they

want to put a face from anywhere in the house.

Description by ALTS Design Office:

This plan is the project that thought about how you take in rich light in a site condition of small space only in Kyoto. Is provided with a dining space gathering of family at the center of the house, that So we thought, was a blow-out there. This well space is also the space which connects a family’s bonds, and also achieves dynamic functions, such as display and room of stairs.. Also captures the light and wind diverse that while taking advantage of the material antique client demand, opening the rich opening, we have created a space with the charm which we want to put a face from anywhere in the house were.


Design Office: ALTS Design Office

Architects: Sumiou Mizumoto, Yoshitaka Kuga

Location: Kyoto, Japan

Area: 93.00 m2

Photographs: Sumiou Mizumoto


Casa Orea | Dionne Arquitectos

 


Design Office: Dionne Arquitectos

Location: Puebla, México

Area: 230.00 m2

Project Year: 2012

Photographs: Francisco Baxin, Pupe Fabre


 

 

Casa Pazza | Studioata

 

 


Design Office: Studioata

Location: Turin, Italy

Project Year: 2016

Photographs:  Barbara Corsico


 

Rough House | Measured Architecture

Description by Measured Architecture:

The Rough House is a single family house and laneway project rooted in the hand-made. With a focus on the relationship of an architect with a boutique building + landscape team, local artisans and select subtrades with a history in hand-made execution, a building emerged which identifies that no one person can envision the outcome of a building built well.

Textural choices have been made, such as carbonized cypress exterior cladding, board-form concrete and repurposed boardform boards white washed for exterior window surrounds and soffit, that address the need for compositional balance not only at the building massing level but also at the scale of fine, medium and coarse material selection. Central to the planning effort is the placement of master bedroom and supporting amenities in the basement adjacent to a full-building-length exterior lightwell to south-eastern light, skinned in weathering steel and accessing a subterranean root cellar. The main floor and second rely heavily on the Japanese principle of shakkei, or “borrowed view”, which attempts to capture a framed view of nature alive rather than create a less spectacular version within the building. As the laneway studio works to eliminate a rear yard at grade, careful consideration has been taken to grant views to an elevated exterior landscape on both green roof and wall of the laneway, and onto the western flanking green roof of principle dwelling form.

Fundamental to the success of this project is the separation of the home from its neighbours in a tight urban condition through the narrowing of building to support increased side yard landscape edges and exterior light well circulation, displaced green space to regain connectivity to yard in an increased densification, and finally a play of textures to increase an intimacy between materials and occupant.


Design Office: Measured Architecture

Project Architect: Clinton Cuddington (project Lead) and Piers Cunnington

Design-Build Ceramic Mural Artist : Dear Human – Hand Made Tile

Location: Kitsilano, Vancouver, Canada

Area Size: 2500 sf

Photographs: Ema PeterAndrew LatreilleMartin Tessler


Fitzroy North Home | Zunica Design

 

Description by Zunica Design:

Aiming to create a clean functional layout that embraced the sightlines and flow of the project this new residential build developed a contemporary persona with crisp finishes and a selection of modern furniture, fixtures and lighting that would withstand family living. A strong integration of the exterior and interior spaces provides a sense of space and connectedness for the family with intelligent shading options to ensure the home has maximum use of passive heating during the winter months and appropriate shading for the hot Australian summers.


Design Office: Zunica Design

Location: Fitzroy North, Victoria, Australia

Photographs: Alex Reinders


Modolell Home | Conti, Cert.

The Modolell Home is situared in Barcelona, Spain.

It was designed by Conti, Cert. Arquitectos.


Design Office: Conti, Cert.

Location: Barcelona, Spain

Photographs: Jose Hevia