Summer House in Greece | Cometa Architects

Cometa Architects has designed a summerhouse in Kea Island, Greece. This house developed for the Mediterranean climate, using local materials and sustainable energy saving methods.


Description by Cometa Architects:

The steep ground and the plot’s narrow dimensions along with the very strict building regulations determine the pronounced and gradient form of the building which rises from the mountain and over the valley of Poisses, to finally balance itself with the surrounding traditional dwellings and the natural context. The island of Kea is characterised by its rocky dry hillsides creating poetic sculptural formations, amplified under the mediterranean sun. This wild raw nature, is what this building tries to preserve along with the use of the traditional manners of building, which have survived through the centuries, but lately neglected. Drylayring stonework locally quarred, low rise building which blend with the context, small openings which control the heat, and rain water collection are some of the methods that local ´architecture without architects´ dwelling culture has been using.

The principal material chosen is the local stone, carefully crafted against the horizontal microcement surfaces. Eager to apply the fundamentals of sustainable construction, the largest sum of the stone used, was from this same stone quarred from excavating the site itself in order to lay the foundations. Additional stone for finishings was brought from the local Stone quarry. Local stonworkers used the traditional method of dry stonework, breaking and shaping the stones according to the form and needs.

This secondary home of a family of four, spreads through 3 correlated volumes, which clearly can be defined as the seating & kitchen volume, the circulation tower and the sleeping & storaging volume. Around these volumes, the perimetrical terraces are unfolding, some under the surface of the hill, some at the same level and some projected over it. This experience of this Cycladic landscape is the design’s main concern expressed through this spatial evolution and relationship of the building with the dramatic land. This is achieved through the traditional method of construction called “kotounto”, a dry, humid-free space between the rock and the building. In such a way, these external spaces, makes the building sometimes trying to break away from the rock and sometimes to reconcile with it.

Apart from this traditional tecnique of the humid free gap between the rock and the building, which is principlally used to drain the waters coming from the mountains, leaving walls and foundations dry, the house includes in its design an under-floor heating installation which circualtes hot water, generated by the solar heaters installed in the roof. The cooling is achieved from cross ventilation, a typical traditional method of local construction having many small openings diagonally placed from each other and also an additional under-floor cooling is provided. The pérgola is shading the big openings from the morning sun leaving the sunset colors slip in and paint the white interior ´canvas´ deep yellow and red. Finally, the rainwater is collected in the 3 rooftops and stored in an underground reservoir.

Another take on the traditional and sustainable island architecture are the simple minimal furnishings, many of which are built into the whitewashed interior. The sofas doubling for storage space, the wraparound counter space in the kitchen; the beds even the benches and wood-topped table of the veranda outdoor’s aim to provide a modest but comfortable living. Materials, such as the natural rope, floor-to-ceiling, “banister”, the wooden kitchen, the pale grey painted wooden window frames and shutters which are contributing in the control of the heat and the ease of the breeze are elements that honor the local tradition but perfectly serve the modern needs.

– HONORABLE MENTION IN DOMES ARCHITECTURE AWARDS IN CATEGORY BEST NEW BUILT, GREECE, 2017

– SILVER AWARD IN A`DESIGN AWARDS, FOR ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING AND STRUCTURE DESIGN CATEGORY, ITALY 2017


Design Office: Cometa Architects

Partner Architect in stage A: Betty Tsaousi
Team: Faidra Matziaraki & Victor Gonzalez Marti
Betty Tsaousi, Olga Balaoura (stage a)
Laura Mascuñan, Denisse Gómez Casco (stage b)

Location: Kea Island, Greece

Structural Engineer: Nikos Zoulamopoulos

Interior design: Faidra Matziaraki & Victor Gonzalez Marti

Site surface: 10530.00 m²

Built surface: 115.00 m²

Photographs: Dimitris Kleanthis


 

Malta Penthouse | Mizzi Studio

The fifth floor penthouse, in Malta, has been designed by Mizzi Studio to flow like a conventional apartment but without walls to demarcate individual spaces.

Description by Mizzi Studio:

Tucked away inside a huge building on an industrial estate overlooking a highway in Malta, is the unexpected penthouse apartment of Maltese-born, London-based architect, Jonathan Mizzi of Mizzi Studio.
The building’s unusual location is a demarcation line between where the residential zone starts and the industrial area ends, but it is exactly this incongruity that drew Mizzi to the location.
The result is an unexpected spacious open-plan penthouse within the former industrial building. More surprising still, are the penthouse’s unrivalled views over to the iconic Birkirkara Church and Mdina, the silent city.
While vast at 1614 SQ FT, this fifth floor penthouse has been designed by Mizzi Studio to flow like a conventional apartment but without walls to demarcate individual spaces. The result is a series of different functional zones with their own respective energy while the overall design has a tranquil and calming aesthetic and effect.
Design Concept: Inspired by Neo-Futurism, the penthouse has a warm “NASA” space bunker feel. Although industrial and raw, the space also feels contemporary and sophisticated.

Design Details: There are two main design features to the penthouse: the free-flowing Island and a curved bulkhead with a floating fireplace. There is a fluid dialogue between their composition within the flat, each piece naturally leading your eye to the other, and back and forth in a circular motion.
The island seamlessly morphs out of the concrete floor, exposing a white resin flooring underside that accentuates its sense of motion. Meanwhile, the warmly back-lit curved bulkhead leads down to an integrated floating fireplace.
Mizzi Studio left the original pre-stressed concrete roof planks exposed to form the ceiling which has hints of warm rust spotting throughout, creating an earthy warm deep and rich texture. The living room floor is split in line with the end of the curved bulkhead changing from micro concrete flooring to a walnut parquet floor.
The general lighting throughout the apartment utilises white surface-mounted track lights with industrial galvanised conduits adding to the futuristic feel.
A combination of dramatic sculptural design and innovative lighting throughout this apartment, serves to create a warm, homely feeling in an otherwise cold open space.


Design Office: Mizzi Studio

Location: Mdina, Malta

Photographs: Studio Konnect


Maison 0.39 | PASCUAL Architecte

 


Design Office: PASCUAL Architecte

Location: Nimes, France

Project year: 2013


 

Grândola House | ColectivArquitectura

Description by ColectivArquitectura:

The choice of location for deployment of the buildings aimed to make the most of the view of the terrain. At the same time it takes a small promontory to the location of a yard, located to the west of the dwelling, for the parking and maneuvering of vehicles.

The outside form resulted from the intention of creating situations of full/empty, adopting a composition of parallelepiped volumes, which create misalignment through its two courtyards, prolonging the experience of the house to the outside.

The location of the openings in the composition of the elevationsprovides visual crossings, the difference in height between the volumes of the rooms, kitchen and the living room, reinforced by a vertical marking the fireplace chimney, resulting in a dynamic composition.

The openings, searching outside framings, act as plans of light of careful proportions that simultaneously capture and filter the surroundings.

The house, with entrance to the West, develops along the north/south axis and the master bedroom, with private toilet, is located on the North top, followed by the living room with a higher ceiling height, the kitchen, with two support areas intended for storage and laundry room, and finally a volume with two rooms with private sanitary facilities.

Across the East housing front, with a direct and privileged relationship with the outside, are located a patio with access through the kitchen and living room, and the pool, surrounded by a paved area with different areas, both in terms of function and material and its permeability.


Design Office: ColectivArquitectura

Interior Design: José Luís Barbosa

Location: Grândola, Portugal

Area: 2225 ft2

Photographs: Fernando Guerra | FG+SG


 

Wooden Box House | Moloney Architects

Wooden Box House is a turn-of-the-century weatherboard home that merges Victorian heritage with a contemporary architectural extension to house a growing family.
The project, located in the regional Victorian town of Ballarat, Australia.

It was designed and renovated by Mick and Jules Moloney, co-founders of Moloney Architects.


Description by Moloney Architects:

Wooden Box House is a turn-of-the-century weatherboard home that merges Victorian heritage with a contemporary architectural extension to house a growing family. The project, located in the regional Victorian town of Ballarat, saw Mick and Jules Moloney, co-founders of Moloney Architects renovate and extend the century-old residence to meet the changing needs of their family of five.

Looking to open up the cramped living quarters, the architects added an open ‘wooden box’ to the rear of the existing house. This new space is joined to the original structure via a connection space with dropped ceiling that acts as a shadow line between the two structures.

The shadow line not only blends the old and new forms so they might sit comfortably side-by-side, but allows the original roof structure to remain unchanged. The result is an open and contemporary living space that respects its heritage context.

The Wooden Box addition also takes advantage of the north-facing block with a large window seat. “This group of vertical windows captures long shafts of sunlight that reach right to the very back of our central living space.

The space receives plenty of natural light and also has a positive psychological effect of feeling warm and cheery. It makes those chilly Ballarat winters much more bearable,” said Moloney Architects Principal, Mick Moloney.

“The window seat is also a lovely space to read and the integration of drawers into the undercavity offers essential storage for children’s toys.”

The heart of the family home, the architects designed the kitchen with a social central island bench. “We incorporated the cooktop into the island with stools opposite to encourage conversation while cooking”, said Moloney Architects co-founder, Jules Moloney. “We love how open it feels, and with the north face of the kitchen space almost all glass, we can open the wide multi-fold doors and connect to the outdoors,” she said.

Mick and Jules have been economical in their use of raw, honest building materials. Formply is used across the kitchen drawer fronts, island bench and skirting boards. Windows and exposed beams are constructed from Tasmanian Oak. Complementing this is flooring in Blackbutt and cladding in Cedar.

“As designers, we are particularly interested in the grain and warmth that natural materials like timber can bring to a space. In this project we’ve employed raw and unadorned materials like plywood and formply to create a relaxed and informal atmosphere. This really encapsulates the way we like to live,” said Mick and Jules Moloney.


Design Office: Moloney Architects

Location: Ballarat, Australia

Area: 450.00 m2

Project Year: 2016

Photographs: Christine Francis


Summer House II | Sinas Architects

The single family residence, Summer House II, is situated in Serifos, Greece.

It was designed by Sinas Architects.

 


Design Office: Sinas Architects

Interior Design: Dimitrios Karadavanis

Location: Serifos, Greece

Photographs: Nikos Stefanis


 

Modolell Home | Conti, Cert.

The Modolell Home is situared in Barcelona, Spain.

It was designed by Conti, Cert. Arquitectos.


Design Office: Conti, Cert.

Location: Barcelona, Spain

Photographs: Jose Hevia


 

Wil’s 11 | The Roof Studio

Wil’s 11 is situated next to a lake in Shah Alam, Malaysia.

It was designed by  The Roof Studio.

Description by The Roof Studio:

As this project is situated next to a lake, the designer has made it a point to feature major natural design elements the capture the soothing vibe of its surroundings and translating it into the interior spaces. Personalized through the use of natural wood, the theme of its design is centred on a modern and contemporary style. The main highlight of this project lies in the design of its living room, which sports a full-length, double volume wood-based wall feature matched with sheer curtains that accentuate the magnificence of its existing architectural structure. On top of that, the designer has coated the interior with a stylish neutral colour palette which complements the design features as the minimalist furnishing approach has enabled the space to stay wide and open, promoting a cosy and comfortable ambience.


Design Office:  The Roof Studio

Location: Shah Alam, Malaysia


 

“Piccola Londra” Guest Mansion | NOS Design

Description by NOS Design:

The initial inspiration for the project which deals with the conservation of an existing building has been to enhance its architectural heritage. The architectural elements and decorations reveal its own history, in combination with the creative hand of the Architect. This is the ambition and the challenge that guided Architect Benedetta Gargiulo Morelli, along with her studio NOS Design, in the recovery and expansion project for the villa of “Piccola Londra”.
The project for “Piccola Londra” Guest Mansion has been designed to reconstruct the villa’s original style and elegant character. Infact, most of the adjacent villas have lost this due to the many transformations, super-elevations and degradation. Furthermore, the elevation of the second floor broke the unifying nature of the building with its twin villa.
Before the works, the building had several issues to be solved: most of the rooms were underutilized or poorly preserved. The basement consisted of a large empty room and an out of service toilet. The mezzanine entailed two damp and unhealthy spaces. The second floor presented a kitchen with no dining area and a small terrace in front of it, which was the only means of access to the additional run-down terrace on the upper floor. Furthermore the garden on the ground floor, already penalized by the position in the backyard, was overgrown and inaccessible. How could such poor conditions preserve the initial charm of “Piccola Londra” sophisticated villa?


Design Office: NOS Design

Location: Rome, Italy