Maisonette P155 | Ippolito Fleitz Group – Identity Architects

 


Description by Ippolito Fleitz Group – Identity Architects :

An architect and a textile designer have created a sanctuary in a listed Wilhelminian building in a sought-after location on the edge of Stuttgart’s city centre. Their new apartment stretches over two floors with an unusual tapering floor plan that resembles a slice of cake. The 290 m² have been transformed into a vibrant cabinet of curiosities, filled with mementos and inspirational pieces, which they have collected or sourced on their travels.

A characteristic period feature of the building is its layout of individual rooms grouped around a central hallway. This layout was carefully modified, respecting the building’s listed status, to create a spacious, open discourse with shifting vistas and overlapping perspectives.

The upbeat is given by a pale grey, gallery-like hallway, which forms a cabinet brimming with travel curiosities. A striking element is a wooden bench from India, which draws you into the space, accentuating the suction effect of the trapezoidal layout. A black, herringbone parquet floor runs from here throughout the apartment, giving the suite of rooms a flowing feel and creating a strong graphic counterpart to the typically bourgeois Wilhelminian architecture.

At the head of the hallway is the living room, a salon-like space with strong contrasting colours, intense graphic elements and large forms. A lemon yellow bookcase is positioned against powder blue walls. A deep pile rug with a bold, geometric pattern in strong colours and a Moustache chair are more works of art than pieces of furniture, yet even these are outdone by the expressive pictures and objects on the walls. Two circular, intersecting shapes on the ceiling take over the circles theme, which is echoed at multiple points in the room, as well as spotlighting life below.

The dining room is dominated by textile materials such as a dark green, silk wallpaper and finds from exotic travels, including Uzbek ikat cloth, Indian silk embroideries, Laotian textile applications and African Losa basketwork. A ceiling mural by Alix Waline brings an additional dynamic to the space. In the centre of the room stands a large rosewood table, about which various chairs are gathered. One end of the table top is lacquered black. This shiny reflective surface creates a bridge to the piano as well as to a smoked oak sideboard hanging on one wall. Its partially black lacquered front resembles a fragmented mirror and dissolves the solidity of its form. A hand-crocheted curtain of paper yarn picks up the textiles theme in a more abstract way and provides a fascinating contrast to the elegant, heavy, putty-coloured cotton velour.

The dining room and salon are connected at their far ends by a small room with a bay window. Here the graphic character of one room and the textile materiality of the other merge in a specially commissioned psychedelic wallpaper, which challenges the eye and forms a provocative backdrop to several colourful artworks. A contrast comes from the more subdued, natural materials world of the furniture and the intense light that is filtered into the room through golden venetian blinds, which shine brightly in the sun.

An asymmetric, curved wall opening in the opposite end of the salon leads into the staircase room, the only room in which the original oak parquet floor has been preserved. The walls of this room are papered with an English,  hand-printed wallpaper featuring an opulent, jungle motif. The exotic atmosphere is heightened by a life-size wooden horse, an archaic artefact from India, which stands before a dark grey, smoked glass wall. Creating a first connection to the upper storey, two suspended lamps emerge from a ceiling opening to hang above the horse, almost like a rider. The upper storey is reached via a staircase with indigo treads and a dark green stringer.

From the staircase room, a second double-leaf door leads into the bedroom, which is also a library. A floor to ceiling bookcase covers the longitudinal wall and draws your gaze into the room. A mirrored wall leading to the dressing room underscores this impression of depth. The dark wood of the bookcase and sideboards coupled with the elegant colour of the walls give the room a delicate feel. A silken Berber rug and the leather of the bed bolster the quiet, elegant impression of the space. A concealed door in the mirrored wall leads into a dressing room, which contains two large, white, hanging wardrobes. Two circular, incised areas of glass dispel the volume of the furniture.

To the right of the hallway lies a spacious bathroom. The salmon-coloured design is in harmonious dialogue with the limestone of the floor and several walls. Multiple mirrored surfaces expand the space and create optical bridges to the other rooms by means of reflections. A freestanding washstand made from rosewood with a superimposed mirror unit form a strong centrepiece, about which are grouped a freestanding bathtub and walk-in shower. Black, wooden, venetian blinds and a black, dotted pattern on the ceiling provide some necessary contrast in the otherwise soft atmosphere.

The bathroom connects through to a gym, which doubles as a guest bedroom. Lemon yellow walls fade into a white ceiling and suffuse the room with energy. A floor to ceiling closet provides storage and conceals a fold-out guest bed, while its mirrored front is the perfect backdrop to your daily workout.

Cooking with friends is one of the owners’ passions. So the kitchen at the other end of the apartment has a stainless steel, industrial-style kitchen block at its centre. Original tiles on the floor and wall provide a scintillating contrast to the precise, sharply edged, solid surface, built-in cupboards. A freestanding marble-topped table offers space for more intimate gatherings.

The guest WC is located next to the kitchen. This small room with its many wall-mounted pipes was panelled to create a clean, polygonal shape. The folded effect of the walls is dissolved by a geometric mural. A softly curving mirror provides a welcome contrast and also expands the space.

The upper storey houses a spacious study and private TV lounge. The light-flooded top floor also has access to a generous terrace with a view of the treetops in the neighbouring avenue. A stunning view over Stuttgart is visible in the other direction. The green theme is programmatic here: The room is filled with succulents of all shapes and shades of green. A bed nestled in one of the dormer windows offers space for additional visitors. An interior bathroom with a steam shower and generous visibility into the room and to the outside creates a sensual centrepiece.

The maisonette is a museum of memories and a showroom for the creativity of its owners in one. In place of a closed, consistent aesthetic, the apartment functions as a collage of variegated moods. Yet in spite of their seeming disparity, a synthesis is achieved that perfectly reflects the personality of the owners in the individual rooms.


                           (TEAM: Kim Angenendt, Hanna Drechsel, Gunter Fleitz
Lena Hainzinger, Peter Ippolito, Masafumi Oshiro
Verena Schiffl, Markus Schmidt)

Location: Stuttgart, Germany

Photographs: Eric Laignel, Zooey Braun


 

 

 

 

 

 

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Modern loft | IDwhite

 


Design Office: IDwhite

Location: Kaunas, Lithuania


 

Apartment in Georgia | Tako Kenkishvili

 

 


Design Office: Tako Kenkishvili

Location: Tbilisi, Georgia


 

Pascĕre Ciboteca | ZDA – Zupelli Design Arquitettura

 


Description by ZDA – Zupelli Design Arquitettura:

Located in the ‘Isola’ district, in Milan, the ” Pascĕre – Ciboteca”, is a contemporary local with a impressive design, able to offer its customers versatile experience, from early morning until late in the evening. Not only a café for breakfast and afternoon break, but also a restaurant and a cocktail bar.

The project concept was created to co-exist different services in one place.
Starting from the large area of the project, we have defined three interior volumes: a service block, for staff and the public; a central block, designed to hold the most of the services of the resturant, including a kitchen; and a glass element that contains a small urban garden, able to attract the attention of customers and offer new points of view on the city.

The interior spaces are born in ‘negative’ and through subtraction define different areas: the bar area illuminated by large windows, the sofas area at the entrance, smaller than the first, directly overlooking the indoor garden and the restaurant area, structured in a “fast and slow food” zone.

Even the floors are designed to create dialogue between different environments, with an original pavement mix. white and black cement tiles with a geometric textures, are arranged like a carpet on an aged dark wooden floor, while in theindoor garden was chosen the raw concrete.

To uniform the areas we chose a light color for the walls, in contrast with a very darker furniture, interrupted by the color chosen for the ‘boiserie’ and the green plants placed all over the local. In fact, the whole environment is based on the mood of the ‘urban forest’: the indoor garden, the tables designed for the restaurant and the vertical wall, enrich every area and create a unique atmosphere.

The result is a sophisticated environment where each element works to a balanced overview. In a mix of wood, iron and vegetation, light and dark colors, intense and soft lighting, once again we define our idea of a metropolitan local.


Design Office : ZDA – Zupelli Design Arquitettura

Location: Quartiere Isola, Milano, Italy

Project Year: 2017

Area: 400.0 sq.m.


 

Loft in a Marmalade Factory | Loft Kolasinski

 


Description by Loft Kolasinski:

Our project was done in a former warehouse of a marmalade factory, which operated before World War II in Szczecin (Poland). The project involved reconstruction of one of the open spaces for an apartment divided into 4 rooms (living room with a kitchenette, bedroom, office, bathroom). In the most part of the loft we preserved historic, wooden floors that have been restored. All the kitchen furniture were designed and built by Loft Kolasiński. Countertops were made of white marble and kitchen furniture of plywood. The rest of the furnishing is vintage furniture and lamps from the 50s and 60s from Denmark, the Czech Republic, Poland and the Netherlands. The furniture have been renovated by Loft Kolasiński. For decoration we used a polish rug from the 30s.


Design Office: Loft Kolasinski

Location: Szczecin, Poland

Area: 80,0 sq. m.

Furniture production : Zbigniew Dzitkowski

Photographs: Karolina Bąk


Voltaire | SABO project

 

Description by SABO project:

The apartment is located in a 1920’s industrial building of Paris’ 11ᵗʰ arrondissement. The initial space of square proportions is stripped down to raw concrete. The sole addition of a central island is enough to define a variety of spaces, entrance, main living space, dressing, horizontal and vertical circulations, without the need for any wall or partition. The rough ceiling runs continuously throughout the apartment while a looping circulation establishes a subtle gradation between the main space and the more private areas. The island cladding consists of 40 aluminum sheets that are custom punched, folded, anodized and mounted on a metal structure. The manipulation of perforated shutters provides the potential for many light and privacy scenarios.


Design Office: SABO Project

Location: Paris, France

Area: 81.0 sq. m.

Photographs: Alexandre Delaunay


 

Apartment GEM | Agence Hivoa

 

 


Design Office: Agence Hivoa

Location: Biarritz, France

Area: 82.0 sq.m.

Project Year: 2017

Photographs: Miguel Ramos


 

Two level floor Apartment | Studio Interjero Architektura + Architect Indre Sunklodiene

 


Design Studio: Studio Interjero Architektura + Architect Indre Sunklodiene

Location: Vilnius, Lithuania

Photographs: Leonas Garbacauskas


 

RS Apartment | Studio 1408

Description by Studio 1408:

This project represents an experiment of materiality: Antithetic Juxtaposition of metal and wood, with the debut of a new finish in the local design language – Bluesteel. Metal sheets are heated and tempered in special industrial ovens. Reaching the temperature of 200 degrees Celsius, steel starts to progressively change its color in shades of yellow and red, then around 300 degrees it catches purple, blue tones. This technique is used by watch makers for tempering watch parts, giving them this beautiful, intense blue tint.

Wood and metal, opposites by tactile and visual perception, can actually match as a state: both are used here as rough, unfinished materials. This antithetical visual assembling reveals a pleasant, industrial scenery which is well-balanced by the gray shades.

From a functional point of view, the planimetry has been modified to suit the clients day-to-day needs, eliminating unjustified parietal obstacles. Thus, the space has been reconfigured to a more “plan libre” type and through it, also the way in which the habitation activities interact with one another; by this we improved the quality of living in these spaces.

In the same conceptual language, we have created scenographies that prevail throughout the transitioning of the spaces. The frames / perspective views form sequential compositions via collages of materials and volumes. These sequences appear gradually throughout the day, by cycling from daytime – exposing the compositions to natural, organic daylight – all the way to nightime – presenting the true compositional scene of the soft artificial lighting.


Design Studio: Studio 1408

Location: Bucarest, Romania

Photographs: Cosmin Dragomir


 

Malangen Peninsula | Stinessen Arkitektur


Description by Stinessen Arkitektur:

Malangen peninsula is an hour´s drive south of Tromsø in Northern Norway. The site is positioned on a ridge rising from the fiord below and overlooks a natural opening in the forest.

The cabin is laid out east to west effectively shielding the opening in the forest, which is only discovered once you enter through the large oak sliding door from the outside couryard. The clients had a clear wish for enough space to welcome family and friends visiting. To gather at the family retreat for weekends or holidays is a beautiful tradition, but the challenge is often that given a few days you also long for some privacy again.

Therefore we planned a main part and an annexe separated by the central covered courtyard which is where you enter their retreat through the oak sliding door. As a response to the cold climate and challenging weather the central courtyard functions as a winter garden, with a fireplace and outdoor kitchen. From here the retreat opens up to the natural clearing in the forest and from here you enter into either the main building or the annexe. Each group of rooms are done as separate segments or boxes to achieve an additional layer of privacy, but also to enhance the main room´s contact to the clearing in the forest and the contact to the outdoors in the transition spaces in between.

The main part and the annexe are composed of two boxes each, the annexe comprised of utility rooms and the relax area with a sauna directly exposed to the view outside in one box and the guest rooms and an activity room in the second. The main part with entrance, children´s room and a small secondary living room in the first box, the main bathroom and master bedroom in the second. A few steps lead down to the open space kitchen an living room set low in the terrain and overlooking the fiord and the afternoon sun to the west. A dedicated exit from the kitchen lead to the south-facing outdoor area where the family enjoy their dinners on warm summer days.

The boxes are all made in wood with the exterior cladding (both indoors and outdoors) in cedar panel which was treated with iron sulfate and kept outside for months before assembly to achieve an even patina regardless of being outdoors or indoors. The interior surfaces are mainly in knot free oak to achieve a warmer contrast to the outside of the boxes. The boxes are all slightly elevated in relation to the in-between spaces. All the in-between spaces have a concrete floor to emphasize that these spaces relate to the terrain and the outdoors in a different manner.

The ceilings in these spaces are all made of oak slats that through the treatment with iron sulfate turn naturally black because of the high content of tannin. The airy and black ceilings retreat from the visual connection to the outside, while contrasting the visually cold of the outdoors and providing a softer acoustics at the same time. The sauna is only separated from the outside by a large frameless glass, underlining the secluded privacy of the clearing in the forest, the interiors custom designed in cedar.

A major part of the interiors such as the dining table, dining bench, beds, wardrobes, the fireplace and sliding door in the wintergarden, etc, are custom designed by Stinessen.


Design Studio: Stinessen Arkitektur

Location: Tromsø, Norway

Photographs: Snorre Stinessen


 

Apartment in Ukraine | Olha Wood

 


Design Studio: Olha Wood

Location: Kiev, Ukraine

Photographs: Andrey Avdeenko


 

 

 

 

Apartment “Heroes” | Gaspar Bonta

“Functions, materials, situations, the mixture of old and new things have to be built up into a momentum…”

Description by Gaspar Bonta:

“We can be heroes, just for one day”
(David Bowie)

I always adored Batman. No superpowers, just an unbelievable persistence. I always considered him as a role model, a hero, when it came to such impossible adventures like this apartment. You see, I love desperately run-down apartments, love to pick out beautiful features and all the right angles, basically to prove, that home is not a place but a state of mind, and a person. Impersonating these spaces and assembling them into a complex personality is more psychology than design. Functions, materials, situations, the mixture of old and new things have to be built up into a momentum, into little heroic acts, like watching sunrise from our park-view bed or the stars at night. The first impulse on arrival to the lobby is that its like purgatory. Bright, shiny. It connects us with the outside world as it connects the service rooms and the guest room with the common living space what contains the kitchen, the dining room and the living room. We can access the master bedroom from this common space, which functions as a standalone suite with its own bathroom and shower, not to mention the unmatchable panorama. No unnecessary spaces, no unused corners. No walls to keep us from each other, only spaces to connect us together, one home, one family.


Design Office: Gaspar Bonta

Location: Budapest, Hungary

Area: 96,00 sq.m.

Photographs: Bálint Jaksa


 

SH House | Paulo Martins Arq & Design

The SH House, in Sever do Vouga, Portugal,  with the clear colours and a minimalist language is the perfect place for a weekend break.

It was designed by Paulo Martins Arq & Design.


Description by Paulo Martins Arq & Design:

Established in only 35m2, this house with an useful floor area of 45 m2 is the perfect place for a weekend break.

With the original outline, the only change was in the existing stairwells, through the usage of weathering steel e dimensioning its usage according to the visual weight in order to hierarchize the absence of mass. This way, it was possible to balance the whole building.

The house is divided in two floors, where the social room, placed in the ground floor, enjoys the direct relation with the outdoor areas, while the suite, located in the first floor, can be reached by indoor stairs used for storage and but also to separate the rooms.

The original outline was as important as the contemporary style added to the building. Clear colours and a minimalist language were used in order to maximize the bounds and give an idea of wider and open area.


Design Office: Paulo Martins Arq & Design

Location: Sever do Vouga, Portugal

Photographs: Its. Ivo Tavares Studio


Summer House in Greece | Cometa Architects

Cometa Architects has designed a summerhouse in Kea Island, Greece. This house developed for the Mediterranean climate, using local materials and sustainable energy saving methods.


Description by Cometa Architects:

The steep ground and the plot’s narrow dimensions along with the very strict building regulations determine the pronounced and gradient form of the building which rises from the mountain and over the valley of Poisses, to finally balance itself with the surrounding traditional dwellings and the natural context. The island of Kea is characterised by its rocky dry hillsides creating poetic sculptural formations, amplified under the mediterranean sun. This wild raw nature, is what this building tries to preserve along with the use of the traditional manners of building, which have survived through the centuries, but lately neglected. Drylayring stonework locally quarred, low rise building which blend with the context, small openings which control the heat, and rain water collection are some of the methods that local ´architecture without architects´ dwelling culture has been using.

The principal material chosen is the local stone, carefully crafted against the horizontal microcement surfaces. Eager to apply the fundamentals of sustainable construction, the largest sum of the stone used, was from this same stone quarred from excavating the site itself in order to lay the foundations. Additional stone for finishings was brought from the local Stone quarry. Local stonworkers used the traditional method of dry stonework, breaking and shaping the stones according to the form and needs.

This secondary home of a family of four, spreads through 3 correlated volumes, which clearly can be defined as the seating & kitchen volume, the circulation tower and the sleeping & storaging volume. Around these volumes, the perimetrical terraces are unfolding, some under the surface of the hill, some at the same level and some projected over it. This experience of this Cycladic landscape is the design’s main concern expressed through this spatial evolution and relationship of the building with the dramatic land. This is achieved through the traditional method of construction called “kotounto”, a dry, humid-free space between the rock and the building. In such a way, these external spaces, makes the building sometimes trying to break away from the rock and sometimes to reconcile with it.

Apart from this traditional tecnique of the humid free gap between the rock and the building, which is principlally used to drain the waters coming from the mountains, leaving walls and foundations dry, the house includes in its design an under-floor heating installation which circualtes hot water, generated by the solar heaters installed in the roof. The cooling is achieved from cross ventilation, a typical traditional method of local construction having many small openings diagonally placed from each other and also an additional under-floor cooling is provided. The pérgola is shading the big openings from the morning sun leaving the sunset colors slip in and paint the white interior ´canvas´ deep yellow and red. Finally, the rainwater is collected in the 3 rooftops and stored in an underground reservoir.

Another take on the traditional and sustainable island architecture are the simple minimal furnishings, many of which are built into the whitewashed interior. The sofas doubling for storage space, the wraparound counter space in the kitchen; the beds even the benches and wood-topped table of the veranda outdoor’s aim to provide a modest but comfortable living. Materials, such as the natural rope, floor-to-ceiling, “banister”, the wooden kitchen, the pale grey painted wooden window frames and shutters which are contributing in the control of the heat and the ease of the breeze are elements that honor the local tradition but perfectly serve the modern needs.

– HONORABLE MENTION IN DOMES ARCHITECTURE AWARDS IN CATEGORY BEST NEW BUILT, GREECE, 2017

– SILVER AWARD IN A`DESIGN AWARDS, FOR ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING AND STRUCTURE DESIGN CATEGORY, ITALY 2017


Design Office: Cometa Architects

Partner Architect in stage A: Betty Tsaousi
Team: Faidra Matziaraki & Victor Gonzalez Marti
Betty Tsaousi, Olga Balaoura (stage a)
Laura Mascuñan, Denisse Gómez Casco (stage b)

Location: Kea Island, Greece

Structural Engineer: Nikos Zoulamopoulos

Interior design: Faidra Matziaraki & Victor Gonzalez Marti

Site surface: 10530.00 m²

Built surface: 115.00 m²

Photographs: Dimitris Kleanthis


 

Villa Martinuzzi | TOBIS – inzenjering

A modern reconstruction of an old stone house was designed by TOBIS – inzenjering.

It’s located in Pula, Croatia.

 


Design Office: TOBIS – inzenjering

Location: Pula, Croatia