SH House | Paulo Martins Arq & Design

The SH House, in Sever do Vouga, Portugal,  with the clear colours and a minimalist language is the perfect place for a weekend break.

It was designed by Paulo Martins Arq & Design.


Description by Paulo Martins Arq & Design:

Established in only 35m2, this house with an useful floor area of 45 m2 is the perfect place for a weekend break.

With the original outline, the only change was in the existing stairwells, through the usage of weathering steel e dimensioning its usage according to the visual weight in order to hierarchize the absence of mass. This way, it was possible to balance the whole building.

The house is divided in two floors, where the social room, placed in the ground floor, enjoys the direct relation with the outdoor areas, while the suite, located in the first floor, can be reached by indoor stairs used for storage and but also to separate the rooms.

The original outline was as important as the contemporary style added to the building. Clear colours and a minimalist language were used in order to maximize the bounds and give an idea of wider and open area.


Design Office: Paulo Martins Arq & Design

Location: Sever do Vouga, Portugal

Photographs: Its. Ivo Tavares Studio


Summer House in Greece | Cometa Architects

Cometa Architects has designed a summerhouse in Kea Island, Greece. This house developed for the Mediterranean climate, using local materials and sustainable energy saving methods.


Description by Cometa Architects:

The steep ground and the plot’s narrow dimensions along with the very strict building regulations determine the pronounced and gradient form of the building which rises from the mountain and over the valley of Poisses, to finally balance itself with the surrounding traditional dwellings and the natural context. The island of Kea is characterised by its rocky dry hillsides creating poetic sculptural formations, amplified under the mediterranean sun. This wild raw nature, is what this building tries to preserve along with the use of the traditional manners of building, which have survived through the centuries, but lately neglected. Drylayring stonework locally quarred, low rise building which blend with the context, small openings which control the heat, and rain water collection are some of the methods that local ´architecture without architects´ dwelling culture has been using.

The principal material chosen is the local stone, carefully crafted against the horizontal microcement surfaces. Eager to apply the fundamentals of sustainable construction, the largest sum of the stone used, was from this same stone quarred from excavating the site itself in order to lay the foundations. Additional stone for finishings was brought from the local Stone quarry. Local stonworkers used the traditional method of dry stonework, breaking and shaping the stones according to the form and needs.

This secondary home of a family of four, spreads through 3 correlated volumes, which clearly can be defined as the seating & kitchen volume, the circulation tower and the sleeping & storaging volume. Around these volumes, the perimetrical terraces are unfolding, some under the surface of the hill, some at the same level and some projected over it. This experience of this Cycladic landscape is the design’s main concern expressed through this spatial evolution and relationship of the building with the dramatic land. This is achieved through the traditional method of construction called “kotounto”, a dry, humid-free space between the rock and the building. In such a way, these external spaces, makes the building sometimes trying to break away from the rock and sometimes to reconcile with it.

Apart from this traditional tecnique of the humid free gap between the rock and the building, which is principlally used to drain the waters coming from the mountains, leaving walls and foundations dry, the house includes in its design an under-floor heating installation which circualtes hot water, generated by the solar heaters installed in the roof. The cooling is achieved from cross ventilation, a typical traditional method of local construction having many small openings diagonally placed from each other and also an additional under-floor cooling is provided. The pérgola is shading the big openings from the morning sun leaving the sunset colors slip in and paint the white interior ´canvas´ deep yellow and red. Finally, the rainwater is collected in the 3 rooftops and stored in an underground reservoir.

Another take on the traditional and sustainable island architecture are the simple minimal furnishings, many of which are built into the whitewashed interior. The sofas doubling for storage space, the wraparound counter space in the kitchen; the beds even the benches and wood-topped table of the veranda outdoor’s aim to provide a modest but comfortable living. Materials, such as the natural rope, floor-to-ceiling, “banister”, the wooden kitchen, the pale grey painted wooden window frames and shutters which are contributing in the control of the heat and the ease of the breeze are elements that honor the local tradition but perfectly serve the modern needs.

– HONORABLE MENTION IN DOMES ARCHITECTURE AWARDS IN CATEGORY BEST NEW BUILT, GREECE, 2017

– SILVER AWARD IN A`DESIGN AWARDS, FOR ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING AND STRUCTURE DESIGN CATEGORY, ITALY 2017


Design Office: Cometa Architects

Partner Architect in stage A: Betty Tsaousi
Team: Faidra Matziaraki & Victor Gonzalez Marti
Betty Tsaousi, Olga Balaoura (stage a)
Laura Mascuñan, Denisse Gómez Casco (stage b)

Location: Kea Island, Greece

Structural Engineer: Nikos Zoulamopoulos

Interior design: Faidra Matziaraki & Victor Gonzalez Marti

Site surface: 10530.00 m²

Built surface: 115.00 m²

Photographs: Dimitris Kleanthis


 

Melanopetra Boutique Hotel | AD Architects

Melanopetra is an atmospheric two apartment boutique hotel built-up around 1850 and totally restored by AD Architects  in 2015 under due diligence with respect to the Nisyrian architecture.

Description by AD Architects:

Melanopetra is uniquely situated in the core of the preserved traditional village Emporios in Nisyros, at an altitude of about 400 meters above the caldera. It is an atmospheric two apartment boutique hotel built-up around 1850 and totally restored in 2015 under due diligence with respect to the Nisyrian architecture. The high-quality restoration preserves and reveals all the traditional elements using only eco-friendly primary materials, especially the local black volcanic stone that gives the house its special character and name.

The architectural intervention attempts to integrate modern minimalist design into the ageless aesthetic of traditional form. The simplicity of the design, structural transparency and the purity of forms and volumes, in harmony with the particular local idiom, are used to highlight the plasticity of the small spaces. The interior spaces combine textured white-washed walls of visible limed stone masonry, screed surfaces and wooden beams to create an oncoplastic set of white and earthy colors harmony displayed by smooth natural and artificial lighting. The uncluttered white minimalistic interiors are highlighted by laid-out levels with built-in furniture and modern equipment.

Visible stonework of black volcanic rock with filled joints dominates the exterior of the house, visually unifying it with the landscape. The outdoor spaces comprise of coated built-in levels, steps, and stone sofas, all integrated in rock formations, bringing a sculptural quality to the natural geometry. The raw structural simplicity and the consistency of materials and engravings on all levels aim to a smooth transition from the exterior to the interior and from the natural to constructed item.

It is about a discreet architectural gesture resulting from a respect towards structural authenticity and the use of ageless materials, and giving prominence to traditional elements through simple means of expression.

The restoration project was implemented through European co-financing as a contribution to the sustainable development of the island.

Melanopetra is the first and only boutique hotel in Nisyros offering a luxury as well as authentic accommodation and is known all over the island for its striking design and concept.


Design Office: AD Architects

Location: Emporios, Nisyros, Greece

Photographs: Yannis Kontos


 

Apartment in historic building | Nasciturus Design


Video:


Design Office: Nasciturus Design

Location: Warsaw, Poland

Photographs: Hanna Dlugosz, Hamish Cox


The Wolf House | Wolf Architects


Description by Wolf Architects:

When you arrive at the house you enter via a formal pedestrian entry. Beyond that is a contemporary Chinese garden which in itself is a playful expression of east meeting west. A bridge over a dry riverbed directs you the office at the rear.

The office can accommodate several people and has its own bathroom and kitchenette. This allows for future use as an additional bedroom or granny flat. Resale is always an important consideration and most of the spaces were designed to be flexible in use.

It was agreed that one of the most unsustainable things in houses is doing premature renovations. This house was designed with long term vision in mind.

At the front of the house is a large north facing yard which provides a great space for children to play privately and securely. It leads onto a generous double height front porch which then directs you into the house.

The front porch has a dark polished concrete floor with a sealant that allows for the floor to also be a large blackboard for children to draw on. The main living space opens onto this northern yard with a set of quality commercial grade bi-fold doors which open completely.

The floor level between the inside, front porch and lawn is very slight and this further blends the inside to the outside.

Entry into the house is through a large walnut veneered door. Instead of a sculpture ahead or painting hanging on the wall, the wall is in itself a piece of art. This approach was taken throughout the house with many of the family’s collections. The objects for display are integrated into the architecture.

The Star Wars action figures for example, are on individual stands on a wall and this forms a part of the walls texture making the whole display a feature in the interior architecture.

The heart of the ground floor is triangulated by the living, dining and kitchen spaces. These areas were considered in the brief to be where the family spend most of their time together and therefore had to be interconnected. They are separated primarily by a double sided fireplace, an example of clearly defined spaces without walls. The kitchen is positioned at the western point of the triangle and acts as a control tower from which most of the house and landscaping beyond can be overseen.

Enhancing Everyday Living…

Encouraging Connectivity throughout…

The residence is separated from the office by an operable glass wall located at the southern end of the dining room. Within the office is a space for one of the classic cars. The dining room is at the bottom of the vertical corridor and by looking upwards one understands why the house is so light filled. Light penetrates in most areas from multiple windows. No artificial light is required throughout the day and at night the house’s lighting is almost 100% LED. The dining room is strategically placed in the centre of the home and with a large void above it to enhance the feeling of sacredness, representing how the family regard meal times spent together daily.

The site was not without its challenges. Certain elements of the previous 1940’s residence we retained for cost saving reasons and in consideration of embodied energy and sentimental value. These areas included:

– The existing master bedroom and ensuite which had been renovated several years prior

– A yellow brick tunnel which now has a mural painted by the owner

– The front fence

– The rear yard

– A large 4 car tin shed

The result was a house that consisted of 28 interconnected spaces unfolding over 10 subtle level changes. The key to the design is a multi-purpose vertical corridor which acts as a thermal chimney. It also allows for many internal views and vistas which are integral to the houses connectivity. Light can also penetrate through the space, allowing the Northern sunlight to penetrate to the deepest parts of the house.


Design Office: Wolf Architects

Location: Victoria, Australia

Area: 441.6 m2

Photographs: Dave Keluza


Party Apartment | Nghiêm Phong + Đào Thành

 


Design Office: Nghiêm Phong, Đào Thành

Location: Keangnam, Ha Noi, VietNam

Area: 350.0 m2

Project Year: 2016

Photographs: Quang Tran


 

 

Maison 0.39 | PASCUAL Architecte

 


Design Office: PASCUAL Architecte

Location: Nimes, France

Project year: 2013


 

Grândola House | ColectivArquitectura

Description by ColectivArquitectura:

The choice of location for deployment of the buildings aimed to make the most of the view of the terrain. At the same time it takes a small promontory to the location of a yard, located to the west of the dwelling, for the parking and maneuvering of vehicles.

The outside form resulted from the intention of creating situations of full/empty, adopting a composition of parallelepiped volumes, which create misalignment through its two courtyards, prolonging the experience of the house to the outside.

The location of the openings in the composition of the elevationsprovides visual crossings, the difference in height between the volumes of the rooms, kitchen and the living room, reinforced by a vertical marking the fireplace chimney, resulting in a dynamic composition.

The openings, searching outside framings, act as plans of light of careful proportions that simultaneously capture and filter the surroundings.

The house, with entrance to the West, develops along the north/south axis and the master bedroom, with private toilet, is located on the North top, followed by the living room with a higher ceiling height, the kitchen, with two support areas intended for storage and laundry room, and finally a volume with two rooms with private sanitary facilities.

Across the East housing front, with a direct and privileged relationship with the outside, are located a patio with access through the kitchen and living room, and the pool, surrounded by a paved area with different areas, both in terms of function and material and its permeability.


Design Office: ColectivArquitectura

Interior Design: José Luís Barbosa

Location: Grândola, Portugal

Area: 2225 ft2

Photographs: Fernando Guerra | FG+SG


 

Apartment “ALISE” | Oksana Dolgopiatova

 

 


Design Office: Oksana Dolgopiatova

Location: Kiev, Ukraine


 

Bare House | Jacobs Yaniv Architects

Description by Jacobs Yaniv Architects:

Bare house is a house of two architects and two children. The design of our own home was an ongoing process of about 6 years.

In that time we tried different forms, sizes, materials, details, all on paper and never realized due to the lack of time to commit ourselves to the design, budget etc. Considering that during that time we gained a lot of experience on other projects and spent hours of conversations with clients, listening to their dilemmas, we became more aware of our own needs and our values became clearer and clearer.

The point in time in which we finally felt ready to build was a combination of both professional and personal clarity as to what we are dreaming of and what we need.

After living on the plot in a small house for many years, and experiencing life by 2 large pecan nut trees, and many other fruit trees, we knew the new house would become part of the existing garden which has been there long before us. The green surroundings, ideal daylight and western breeze from the close by Mediterranean were our starting point.

The choice of materials was a very determined agenda to work with materials at their bare, basic state; celebrating form and structure in their most sincere condition. Celebrating also what is to us, a harmonious and subtle joining with the well-grounded garden.

The same materials are carried through to the inside to blur boundaries between inside and outside.

Concrete and blockwork are the most common building materials and building techniques in Israel. On a practical note, the raw finishes weather respectfully and aesthetically unlike render that always needs refurbishment. We love the local materials a lot and are always disappointed when render covers everything.

The height of the house is derived from the dimensions of the blocks and of a subtle search for powerful harmony in scale between people and space, between the street and the house, between the land and the tress.

A thin concrete roof hovers above the centre space allowing a constant glimpse at the sky and tree tops and examines the question of weight of the chosen ‘heavy materials’.

In the public area a two-sided iron library crosses and separates between kitchen and lounge without disrupting the ceiling. The design of the library purposefully creates two ‘gates’ between the two sides.

Questioning the space for a single family and provoking the programmatic layout, we have decided to split between the children’s area and our area to the ends of the house while the meeting point for everybody is in the centre, where lounge, kitchen and dining are right in front of the trees. The desire was that the lounge would act like a court yard; An enclosed garden, an extension of the garden inside the house. Each area is defined by its own roof which defragments and reduces the general span of the house.

The house is built on one story, about half the height of the trees; So on the one hand it does not overpower the trees but on the other hand, when inside, it feels very spacious and airy, with openings facing east and west for optimum daylight and air. Outside the main house there are decked walkways and two additional enclosed service spaces which together create the atmosphere of a small village interweaving indoors and outdoors.


Design Office: Jacobs Yaniv Architects

Location: Herzliya, Israel

Area: 270.00 m2


 

Rough House | Measured Architecture

Description by Measured Architecture:

The Rough House is a single family house and laneway project rooted in the hand-made. With a focus on the relationship of an architect with a boutique building + landscape team, local artisans and select subtrades with a history in hand-made execution, a building emerged which identifies that no one person can envision the outcome of a building built well.

Textural choices have been made, such as carbonized cypress exterior cladding, board-form concrete and repurposed boardform boards white washed for exterior window surrounds and soffit, that address the need for compositional balance not only at the building massing level but also at the scale of fine, medium and coarse material selection. Central to the planning effort is the placement of master bedroom and supporting amenities in the basement adjacent to a full-building-length exterior lightwell to south-eastern light, skinned in weathering steel and accessing a subterranean root cellar. The main floor and second rely heavily on the Japanese principle of shakkei, or “borrowed view”, which attempts to capture a framed view of nature alive rather than create a less spectacular version within the building. As the laneway studio works to eliminate a rear yard at grade, careful consideration has been taken to grant views to an elevated exterior landscape on both green roof and wall of the laneway, and onto the western flanking green roof of principle dwelling form.

Fundamental to the success of this project is the separation of the home from its neighbours in a tight urban condition through the narrowing of building to support increased side yard landscape edges and exterior light well circulation, displaced green space to regain connectivity to yard in an increased densification, and finally a play of textures to increase an intimacy between materials and occupant.


Design Office: Measured Architecture

Project Architect: Clinton Cuddington (project Lead) and Piers Cunnington

Design-Build Ceramic Mural Artist : Dear Human – Hand Made Tile

Location: Kitsilano, Vancouver, Canada

Area Size: 2500 sf

Photographs: Ema PeterAndrew LatreilleMartin Tessler


Home in Taiwan | MORI design

 


Design Office: MORI design

Design team: TsenYeh Chang, Chin Ling Chang

Location: Yun-Lin County ,Taiwan

Area: 274 m2

Project Year: 2016

Photographs: Moooten


 

Apartment in Norway | Nordico

 


Design Office: Nordico

Location: Oslo, Norway


 

Apartment in Vladivostok | ONI Architects


Design Office: ONI Architects

Location: Vladivostok, Russia

Area: 75,5 m2


 

Summer House II | Sinas Architects

The single family residence, Summer House II, is situated in Serifos, Greece.

It was designed by Sinas Architects.

 


Design Office: Sinas Architects

Interior Design: Dimitrios Karadavanis

Location: Serifos, Greece

Photographs: Nikos Stefanis